Every piece we offer is unique. It can be styled to match your needs. But how do you determine what style matches right? How do you know what wood type is the right one? What different options are you able to choose from and which ones do you need? In this section we go over the process from choosing out the right piece for you, placing your order, build, finishing, and finally having it brought to your home.

Choose the Right Piece

The beauty of working Amish builders and looking to get Amish crafted furniture is the customization you’re able to do. Each piece of furniture crafted is unique to itself making it one of a kind. There is a drawback though, since there are so many options it can be overwhelming at times and that is where we come into help. Which options are right for me? What size table do I need to sit 8 people? Will my 55″ TV fit on a 55″ wide TV console? What’s the difference between a Brown Maple and Hard Maple? In our FAQs page, we go over some of these questions. Granted, not all of them answered and that is why you’re always welcome to contact us. We’re always here to help you and more than glad to answer any questions you have.

Getting Started

This isn’t your average shopping experience. We like to call Amish furniture a “build your own” furniture deal. The benefits of genuine Amish furniture is everything is typically built-to-order so you have a vast range of customization you’re able to do. From what is made out of, the hardware, size, stain, etc. The options are virtually endless. With so many options, how do you know which choices are the right choice? That’s where we come in! Rather than overloading you from the start we try to make the process simple. Let’s take everything one step at a time and start with the basics. First thing is first: what to have it made out of?

Solid American Hardwoods

Every piece is different but they all share one thing: each piece is made from solid American hardwoods. Picking out the right wood varies from what piece you’re looking to get. Below we’ll go over the basics of each wood.

Natural Red Oak
Natural Red Oak

The standard wood for our solid wood furniture is Oak. Oak is characterized by its orange reddish hue with the sapwood being white to light brown. The wood has a pronounced opened grain and is very durable with good wear-resistance. The stain absorbs into this open grain pattern becoming darker where the grain is close and lighter where the grain is more open. This is an ideal choice if you desire a warm look.

Oak is perfect for kitchen sets. It’s cost effective and lands in the middle of durability among the woods we offer. It takes the daily wear-and-tear better and due to the large wavy grain it hides dings and dents far better than other woods. The pitfalls Oak falls into is that most people associate Oak with a “country” styled wood with the traditional Golden Honey color. Oak can be modernized by applying darker stains however it limits your design choices.

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Cost effective “Dated” look Kitchen sets Modern looks
Strong hardwood Grain varies heavily Office desks
Timeless look Bedroom sets
Unique grain Living room sets
Natural Brown Maple

Brown Maple is a unique combination of brown, tan, white and cream streaks, and has a more rustic appearance. It is a softer wood so it is more prone to scratches and denting with heavy use. Brown Maple’s naturally soft grain best absorbs medium to dark stains and its smooth surface is ideal for painted finishes. Choosing a lighter colored stain will best showcase the natural range of grain colors in Brown Maple, while a darker stain will blend the grain colors better.

Brown Maple falls on the softer side of the hardwoods we offer. Don’t get Brown Maple wrong though, it IS a hardwood however it is on the softer side compared to the other hardwoods. Brown Maple works well on bedroom outfits, living room pieces, and more modern styles. It is real touchy when it comes to pieces such as kitchen tables or office desks. Due to the softer nature of Brown Maple it is more prone to dings and dents and is just soft enough to where if someone writes hard enough, the writing would go right into the wood.

Dings and dents are inevitable parts of owning furniture. Wood is not an indestructible material so it’s important to understand that wear and tear will happen. Some woods will take wear and tear better than others but it can still happen. This is why we recommend certain woods over others and will, on occasion, stray away from some on certain pieces.

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Cost effective smooth wood Softer hardwood Dining sets Kitchen sets
Clean appearance Grain appearance varies heavily Bedroom sets Office desks
Modern look Painted pieces
Modern look
Natural Cherry Wood (Aged)

Cherry wood has a fine satin-smooth texture and a circular grain pattern. The heartwood of cherry varies from a rich red to reddish brown, while the sapwood is creamy-white in contrast. Over time it will darken with exposure to light and heat. The wood may also naturally contain brown pith flecks and small pit pockets. Because it is a softer wood, it is more prone to denting with heavy use. Cherry wood has a natural reddish hue and this warmth is intensified by all of the cherry stains. When stained, this fine grain has a very even-toned finish.

Natural Cherry Wood Variations
Cherry board photo courtesy of Woodcraft magazine.

Cherry falls on the softer side of the hardwoods we offer. Don’t get Brown Maple wrong though, it IS a hardwood however it is on the softer side compared to the other hardwoods. Cherry works well on bedroom outfits, living room pieces, modern and even traditional styles. It is real touchy when it comes to pieces such as kitchen tables or office desks. Due to the softer nature of Cherry it is more prone to dings and dents and is just soft enough to where if someone writes hard enough, the writing would go right into the wood.

Dings and dents are inevitable parts of owning furniture. Wood is not an indestructible material so it’s important to understand that wear and tear will happen. Some woods will take wear and tear better than others but it can still happen. This is why we recommend certain woods over others and will, on occasion, stray away from some on certain pieces.

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Smooth, feathery wood Softer hardwood Dining sets Kitchen sets
Clean appearance Wood darkens with light Bedroom sets Office desks
Modern look Has more natural “defects” Traditional look Cost effective budgets (higher costing wood)
Timeless look Modern look
Natural Quartersawn White Oak

Quarter Sawn White Oak has a unique grain pattern which is achieved by cutting the wood at a 90 degree angle to the tree’s growth rings. If you love furniture with texture, then Quarter Sawn is a great choice. This wood has a cooler white to sage undertone and is very durable with good wear-resistance. Because Quarter Sawn White Oak is cut at an angle, it exhibits a tight grain with dramatic light and dark tones. Quarter Sawn White Oak absorbs stains richly and evenly. The natural variation of color exhibited in the wood grain is enhanced with staining.

A video provided by Frank Miller Lumber Quartersawn Hardwoods in Indiana demonstrates just how a log gets quartersawned:

Quartersawn White Oak is synonymous with the Arts and Crafts and Mission style furniture. Quartersawn White Oak is in the middle of durability among the hardwoods we offer. Due to the way the wood is cut, there is roughly 30% lumber loss which makes the price of the wood increase.

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Strong hardwood Doesn’t work well with modern looks Dining sets Contemporary styles
Unique grain Inconsistent grain Bedroom sets Cost effective budgets (higher costing wood)
Timeless look Shows dents more when against the grain Timeless look
Natural Hard Maple

Hard Maple is one of the hardest domestic woods in the USA. Because of its hardness, it is very durable. The sapwood is creamy white with a golden hue and the heartwood varies from light to dark golden brown. The wood has a close, fine texture and a light circular grain pattern. The light tone of Hard Maple makes the stain colors appear bold and bright, while the hard and smooth texture makes it less suited to dark stains. The hardness can prevent the stain from soaking into the wood, which can create darker stained areas. This wood captures light and brightens any space.

Hard Maple is the second strongest hardwood we offer. It is also the “cleanest” hardwood we offer as well (little to no variation in grain). To get an idea of how strong Hard Maple is, bowling alley lanes used to be made out of Hard Maple and it is one of the 3 woods baseball bats are made out of. Hard Maple is perfect for modern kitchen sets due to the clean grain appearance and hardness. One thing to note though is when darker stains are applied to a smooth wood like Hard Maple, hair line scratches are more noticeable. This is due to the fact that the wood is so smooth leaving no grain to help distract your eye from the hair line scratches. The upside is these scratches will be in the top coat leaving the possibility for refinishing available.

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Strong hardwood Shows more hairline scratches on dark stains Dining/kitchen sets Cost effective budgets (higher costing wood)
Little to no grain, smooth Moves more due to humidity Bedroom sets
Modern/Contemporary look Modern/Contemporary look
Natural Hickory

Hickory has a contrasting reddish and cream color grain and it is a beautiful wood for furniture. It has a medium grain that gives an earthy feel with a smooth look. It is also the strongest wood type that we offer. Every wood is prone to natural elements such as humidity. Each wood will swell and contrast due to humidity but hickory will do it the most. Hickory moves roughly a ¼” per foot just due to humidity changes. With hickory, you will need to be more mindful on changes in humidity. Most modern homes are equipped with a humidifier and dehumidifier built into the AC system but we always recommend picking up a hydrometer.

Hickory is the toughest wood we offer. It takes almost 2 pounds worth of pressure before there is even a mare in the wood. Hickory is also notorious for a “zebra” pattern effect. This effect is more noticeable on light stains and gets more masked when darker stains are applied. Hickory is a dense wood which is where most of its strength comes. Because of its density, it is also a very heavy wood. Hickory isn’t a great wood for people with back issues, elderly, or those who have a hard time lifting furniture.

 

 Pros Cons Great For Not Great With
Strong hardwood Very heavy wood Dining/kitchen sets Cost effective budgets (higher costing wood)
Slim, subtle grain Moves more due to humidity Bedroom sets Elderly or those that are easily strained from lifting
Rustic look Inconstant grain Rustic look

Now these are just the primary woods we work with. These are also the main woods we offer online except for a few exceptions on certain pieces. To view our other woods and to read more into their toughness, visit our Wood Types section. You’re also have to get more complex designs by mixing woods together. This is more advanced and can be tricky since these sort of works aren’t always timeless and don’t work everywhere.

The Final Steps

You’ve measured twice, looked at some samples and pegged down a color, all that’s left is to get your furniture going. In order to have any order get started, all we require is half of your full total and the other half isn’t due until your furniture is just about to be delivered to your home. You can check out our Payment Options to see what payment options are available to you. You can also figure out what shipping will be by adding all of your furniture into your cart and enter your state and zip code under Calculate Shipping. Once you’ve settled on everything, we overlook your order to ensure everything makes sense for us, our builders, and especially you. The last thing you want is to have your furniture built but built wrong. If everything looks alright, we fax your order out to our builders to have it built.

The Building Process

The building process typically takes anywhere from 4 to 6 weeks. It truly depends on the builder’s workload. It could be done as quick as 2 weeks for your furniture to be built. The flip side though is it could take up to 8 weeks to have it built. We try not to bother our builders too much when it comes to this. Every piece is built from scratch and does take time.

We always recommend to call around the 5 week mark after placing your order to get a status of where your order is at. This usually will help give you a good indication on how much longer it will be before you receive your furniture. If we don’t see your order at our stain shop by 7 week, that is when we start pulling beards and snapping suspenders asking where your furniture is at.

Finishing Everything Off

We use a central stain shop for all of our orders. The benefit of doing this rather than letting the builders stain your furniture is every piece will come out looking the same. Even if you have the same color on each piece, each builder might stain it a bit different giving it a possible different look and feel. Having a central stain shop takes that possibility away.

Once your whole order shows up at our stain shop is when the staining process begins. First, your furniture has the stain sprayed onto it with a PSI gun to ensure it gets into the wood. This way if the any dings and dents happen, it will still have the color underneath and not show a obvious light spot.

After the stain is applied the ladies hand wipe everything to ensure there are no drip marks. Ensuring there are no drip marks, your furniture goes back and has the finish applied with a different PSI gun. Again, it gets sent back to the ladies to have it hand wipe it removing any drip marks. Then your furniture is placed inside what is essentially a giant oven. This process is to heat up the finish to a specific degree and have the resin catalyze on itself to create the seamless and durable finish. Once it’s finished with this step, your furniture is left to sit for about 2 to 3 days and have the finish settle.

The Home Stretch

Your furniture is now built, finished, and finally ready to take its place in your home. Depending on which shipping option you chose will determine how it get ships out to you. We offer two different type of delivery methods: Curbside and White Glove. There are a couple differences between the two. The first difference is how your furniture is shipped to you. Curbside delivery has the your furniture shipped to your front door. Where as White Glove will have your furniture actually set up inside your home. Price is another difference between the two. Curbside is cheaper than White Glove. Alternatively, you can pick up your furniture at our showroom, free of charge of course.

A common phrase we like to say is: We’re only as fast as our slowest builder. We can only get your furniture for you as fast as our builder can build it. Typically though, our average build times are:

  • Local Customers out of Michigan: 8 – 12 weeks
  • Out-of-State Customers: 10 – 16 weeks

For out-of-state customers, this time also accommodates shipping time. Though, this still does vary from time to time. On average, our turn around time for local customers is about 10 weeks. For out-of-state customers, the turn around time is typically 12 weeks. These are just estimates however because different variables affect how long it takes for you to receive your furniture.